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image: Image of the Day: Plastic Feast

Image of the Day: Plastic Feast

By The Scientist Staff | October 30, 2017

New research suggests that plastic might just “taste good” to hard corals.

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Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

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image: Fish Smell ATP to Find Food

Fish Smell ATP to Find Food

By Sandhya Sekar | September 1, 2017

Sensory neurons in the tip of the zebrafish nose respond to molecular signals released from food sources.

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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By Ruth Williams | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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image: A Panoply of Animal Senses

A Panoply of Animal Senses

By The Scientist Staff | September 1, 2016

Animals have receptors for feeling gravity, fluid flow, heat, and electric and magnetic fields.

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image: Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

By Alison F. Takemura | September 1, 2016

Drosophila antennae let the insects seek out moisture levels they like best.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By Sandeep Ravindran | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: Olfactory Fingerprints

Olfactory Fingerprints

By Jef Akst | June 24, 2015

People can be identified by the distinctive ways they perceive odors, a new study shows.

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image: Pleasure To Smell You

Pleasure To Smell You

By Jef Akst | March 4, 2015

People tend to sniff their mitts after shaking hands with someone of the same sex, suggesting that the traditional greeting may transmit chemosensory signals.

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image: Vampire Bats Lack Bitter Taste

Vampire Bats Lack Bitter Taste

By Jef Akst | June 25, 2014

With a diet of blood, the flying mammals have largely lost the ability to taste bitter flavors.

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