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image: Summer Science, British Style

Summer Science, British Style

By | July 8, 2011

The Royal Society's annual science extravaganza packs some interesting stuff into 5 days of love and research.

3 Comments

image: Air Pollution Stunts Cognition

Air Pollution Stunts Cognition

By | July 6, 2011

Particulates in the air can cause impaired learning and depression in mice.

21 Comments

Brain Cells Self-Amplify

By | July 5, 2011

A certain type of neural precursor does it all—replaces itself, differentiates into specialized brain cells, and multiplies into more stem-cell-like cells.

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image: Pain-Free Love

Pain-Free Love

By | July 1, 2011

Love can buffer people from pain by invoking feelings of safety and reassurance.

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image: Repainting Ancient Birds

Repainting Ancient Birds

By | July 1, 2011

Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of trace metals in avian fossils over 120 million-year-old, researchers reconstruct the pigment patterns of their feathers—revealing some of the extinct birds' long-lost colors.

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image: The Birth of Optogenetics

The Birth of Optogenetics

By | July 1, 2011

An account of the path to realizing tools for controlling brain circuits with light.

33 Comments

image: OPSINS: Tools of the trade

OPSINS: Tools of the trade

By | July 1, 2011

The optogenetic toolset is composed of genetically encoded molecules that, when targeted to specific neurons in the brain, enable the electrical activity of those neurons to be driven or silenced by light. 

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image: For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

By | July 1, 2011

Eleanor Simpson on how dopamine helps rats learn and may lead humans to addiction.

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image: Best in Academia, 2011

Best in Academia, 2011

By | July 1, 2011

Meet some of the finalists of this year's Best Places to Work in Academia survey. 

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image: Foresight

Foresight

By | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

12 Comments

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