Loading...

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Living Color

Image of the Day: Living Color

By The Scientist Staff | March 8, 2018

Biodegradable pigments could be custom-grown by bacteria in the future, say researchers.  

0 Comments

image: Hungry Macrophages Keep Tattoos on Mice’s Skin

Hungry Macrophages Keep Tattoos on Mice’s Skin

By Diana Kwon | March 7, 2018

A new study reveals that a constant stream of ink-gobbling immune cells helps hold tattoos in place.

0 Comments

image: Social Dominance Comes At a Cost

Social Dominance Comes At a Cost

By Richard Kemeny | March 5, 2018

Dominant male mammals are particularly at risk of infection by parasites.

5 Comments

image: Diabetes Is Five Diseases, Not Two

Diabetes Is Five Diseases, Not Two

By Jim Daley | March 5, 2018

The new classification system could help improve personalized medicine approaches to the disease.

1 Comment

image: Slime Mold in Residence

Slime Mold in Residence

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 2, 2018

At Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum—both a “visiting scholar” and a model organism—to examine human societal and political quandaries.  

0 Comments

A molecule produced by a strain of Staphylococcus epidermis interferes with DNA synthesis.

0 Comments

Patients with the rare autoimmune condition, highlighted in the Oscar-nominated film The Big Sick, currently have limited treatment options.

0 Comments

image: Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

By Anna Azvolinsky | March 1, 2018

After discovering a novel organelle found in protozoan parasites, the University of Pennsylvania’s Roos created a widely used eukaryotic pathogen database.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: From Sediments to Sequences

Infographic: From Sediments to Sequences

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

How to analyze ancient proteins

0 Comments

image: Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

By Kerry Grens | February 28, 2018

Previously considered immobile, these cells swoop in to seal epithelial holes and clean up cellular detritus.  

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Salk Institute Suspends Cancer Scientist Inder Verma
  2. Long-Term Study Reveals Flip in Plant Responses to Carbon Dioxide
  3. Jim Bridenstine Confirmed to Lead NASA
  4. RNA Injection Restores Hearing in Guinea Pigs