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image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.

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image: Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

By | May 14, 2013

Symbiotic fungi on the roots of bean plants can act as an underground signaling network, transmitting early warnings of impending aphid attacks.  

1 Comment

image: Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

By | May 9, 2013

The decline of a population of Arctic foxes isolated on a small Russian island may be due to mercury pollution from their diet of seabirds and seals.

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image: Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

By | April 24, 2013

Researchers in the Amazon are measuring how much carbon dioxide fertilizes the rainforest.

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image: Sensing Calories Without Taste

Sensing Calories Without Taste

By | April 22, 2013

Rodents and fruit flies appear to be able to sense nutrients even when they can’t taste the food they’re eating. Now, researchers are trying to figure out how.

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image: Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

By | April 8, 2013

Scientists are stumped as to why hundreds of starved pups have been washing up on the California shore.

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image: Bridges for UK Water Voles

Bridges for UK Water Voles

By | March 20, 2013

Newly constructed ramps will expand the habitat available to a colony of water voles in London, and similar ramps elsewhere could encourage isolated populations to mix.   

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image: Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

By | March 8, 2013

Native Australian frog tadpoles outcompete the tadpoles of the invasive cane toad, suggesting the native frogs could form part of a suburban control program.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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