The Scientist

» publishing and cell & molecular biology

Most Recent

image: Making the Rounds

Making the Rounds

By | July 17, 2017

Circular RNA biogenesis occurs when RNA fragments are bent into closed loops of one or more exons and/or introns.

0 Comments

image: Messing with the Microbiome

Messing with the Microbiome

By | July 17, 2017

Two new techniques allow researchers to manipulate the activity of gut bacteria. 

0 Comments

image: Cell Cannibalism as Cancer Defense

Cell Cannibalism as Cancer Defense

By | July 11, 2017

A new study suggests that the mysterious process by which one cell consumes another may be triggered by cell division, potentially helping to fight tumor growth.

0 Comments

The cell-surface receptor, SIRP-alpha, initiates the innate immune response in hosts.  

0 Comments

image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

0 Comments

image: Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

By | June 15, 2017

A proposed mechanism for how bearded dragons with male chromosomes hatch as females at high temperatures

0 Comments

image: Journal Cleans Up Image Archives

Journal Cleans Up Image Archives

By | June 12, 2017

Molecular and Cellular Biology has found numerous errors after launching a retrospective sweep of the figures it’s published in recent years. 

0 Comments

A new screening tool flags dozens of papers with potential errors.

0 Comments

The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

1 Comment

image: Website Flags Wrongly Paywalled Papers

Website Flags Wrongly Paywalled Papers

By | May 31, 2017

Thousands of open access papers have mistakenly asked readers to pay access fees, but publishers are correcting the errors. 

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

  4. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

RayBiotech