The Scientist

» publishing and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

By | November 1, 2017

The blood-brain barrier is a collection of specialized cells and proteins that control the movement of molecules from the blood to the central nervous system.

0 Comments

image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

0 Comments

image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

1 Comment

Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

1 Comment

With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Share Your Data

Opinion: Share Your Data

By , , and | October 24, 2017

Our analysis of a collection of open-access datasets quantifies their benefit to the scientific community.

2 Comments

image: Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

By | October 23, 2017

Researchers identify 72 novel genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk.

0 Comments

These researchers join around 200 research institutions that have cut ties with the publishing giant to support the ongoing push for open access and favorable pricing.

1 Comment

image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

0 Comments

image: Papers Based on Misidentified Cell Lines Top 32,000

Papers Based on Misidentified Cell Lines Top 32,000

By | October 16, 2017

An analysis of contaminated literature finds that tens of thousands of papers used cell lines of questionable origins—and these were in turn cited by hundreds of thousands of other papers.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Man Receives First In Vivo Gene-Editing Therapy
  2. Researchers Build a Cancer Immunotherapy Without Immune Cells
  3. Long-term Study Finds That the Pesticide Glyphosate Does Not Cause Cancer
  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

RayBiotech