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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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image: Hundreds of Pterosaur Eggs Discovered in China

Hundreds of Pterosaur Eggs Discovered in China

By Kerry Grens | November 30, 2017

The fossil booty includes some eggs with embryo remains inside, and points to group nests involving long-term parental care.

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image: Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 

Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 

By The Scientist Staff | November 29, 2017

Scientists have identified a new genus of extinct horse that lived in North America during the last ice age. 

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image: Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

By The Scientist Staff | November 28, 2017

Scientists study the development of scales in skate embryos. 

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The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.

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image: Optogenetic Therapies Move Closer to Clinical Use

Optogenetic Therapies Move Closer to Clinical Use

By Shawna Williams | November 16, 2017

With a clinical trial underway to restore vision optogenetically, researchers also see promise in using the technique to treat deafness, pain, and other conditions.

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By The Scientist Staff | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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image: Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

By Katarina Zimmer | November 2, 2017

The Tapanuli orangutan has been identified as the newest species of great ape, but also likely the most endangered. 

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image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By Mary Bates | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

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image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By The Scientist Staff | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

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