The Scientist

» archaeology and immunology

Most Recent

image: B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers identify a subset of proinflammatory cytokine-producing B cells that may spark multiple sclerosis-related inflammation.  

0 Comments

image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

0 Comments

image: Dengue’s Downfall?

Dengue’s Downfall?

By | September 15, 2015

Researchers characterize a protein that could be key to the virus’s virulence—and to developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease.

0 Comments

image: Behind the <em>H. naledi</em> Find

Behind the H. naledi Find

By | September 10, 2015

See scientists at work near the site where a new Homo species was recently found.

0 Comments

image: New <em>Homo</em> Species Found

New Homo Species Found

By | September 10, 2015

Researchers describe H. naledi, an ancient human ancestor of unknown age that may have buried its dead.

8 Comments

image: Ancient DNA Elucidates Basque Origins

Ancient DNA Elucidates Basque Origins

By | September 9, 2015

Researchers find that the people of northern Spain and southern France are an amalgam of early Iberian farmers and local hunters.

0 Comments

image: Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

By | September 8, 2015

Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Body, Heal Thyself

Body, Heal Thyself

By | September 1, 2015

Reviving a decades-old hypothesis of autoimmunity

8 Comments

image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

1 Comment

image: TB over Time

TB over Time

By | August 1, 2015

Eighteenth-century DNA sequences yield insights into the history of tuberculosis infections.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Secret Eugenics Conference Uncovered at University College London
  2. Like Humans, Walruses and Bats Cuddle Infants on Their Left Sides
  3. How Do Infant Immune Systems Learn to Tolerate Gut Bacteria?
  4. Scientists Continue to Use Outdated Methods
AAAS