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Contributors

By | November 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Dating the Origin of Us

Dating the Origin of Us

By | November 1, 2013

Theoretical anthropogeny seeks to understand how Homo sapiens rose to a position of global dominance.

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Exploring the Neuron Forest

By | November 1, 2013

Innovations in imaging techniques and genetic sequencing take neuroscience to a new level.

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Lozano on DBS

By | November 1, 2013

Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano discusses deep-brain stimulation in this TEDx talk.

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Salary Stats

By | November 1, 2013

Surprising trends reveal themselves in this year's Salary Survey statistics.

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Some Nerve

By | November 1, 2013

The neuron-inspired art of erstwhile neuroscientist Greg Dunn

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Speaking of Science

By | November 1, 2013

November 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: 2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2013

The Scientist opened up its annual Salary Survey to our international readers for the first time, revealing stark differences between average pay in the U.S., Europe, and the rest of the world.

9 Comments

image: The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers are piecing together the devilishly complex sets of genetic alterations underlying schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

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image: Waste-Management Consultant

Waste-Management Consultant

By | November 1, 2013

By audaciously pursuing an abandoned area of research, Ana María Cuervo discovered how cells selectively break down their waste, and revealed the health consequences when that process malfunctions.

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