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image: Opinion: Academic Waste

Opinion: Academic Waste

By Linda Feighery | October 17, 2013

From funding to publishing, academic research needlessly burns through time and money.

3 Comments

image: Ketamine Alternative Shows Promise

Ketamine Alternative Shows Promise

By Abby Olena | October 17, 2013

Researchers show that lanicemine is an effective antidepressant without the adverse effects of the related hallucinogenic drug.

0 Comments

image: Bonding in the Lab

Bonding in the Lab

By Kate Yandell | October 1, 2013

How to make your lab less like a factory and more like a family

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Evolution and Medicine</em>

Book Excerpt from Evolution and Medicine

By Robert Perlman | October 1, 2013

In Chapter 11, “Man-made diseases,” author Robert Perlman describes how socioeconomic health disparities arise in hierarchical societies.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | October 1, 2013

Perv, Behind the Shock Machine, The Gaia Hypothesis, and Life at the Speed of Light

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Kate Yandell | October 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Get a Whiff of This

Get a Whiff of This

By Mary Beth Aberlin | October 1, 2013

An issue devoted to the latest research on how smells lead to actions

2 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By The Scientist Staff | October 1, 2013

October 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

By Kate Yandell | October 1, 2013

A scientist’s desperate attempts to prove that Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy landed him on trial, but his insights into the disease’s pathology were eventually vindicated.

0 Comments

image: Three-Way Parenthood

Three-Way Parenthood

By Yehezkel Margalit, Michio Hirano, and John D. Loike | October 1, 2013

Avoiding the transmission of mitochondrial disease takes a trio, but raises a host of logistical issues.

2 Comments

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