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New research provides evidence that the ancient hominin species might not be so ancient after all.

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The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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image: Learning Your Stripes

Learning Your Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Science’s lowest common denominator has always been patterns.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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Scientists are criticizing the claim that hominins were in North America more than 100,000 years earlier than the currently accepted estimation.

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image: Another New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>

Another New Timeline for Homo naledi

By | April 27, 2017

The ancient human may have lived around 200,000 to 300,000 years ago—much more recently than previously estimated.

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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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