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An 88,000-year-old finger bone places human ancestors in Arabia earlier than previously believed.

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image: Scientists in Chile Protest Mummy Study

Scientists in Chile Protest Mummy Study

By Jim Daley | March 29, 2018

The Chilean government contends that the remains of a mummified fetus, recently sequenced by US researchers, were exhumed illegally.

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image: Image of the Day: Pleistocene Footprints

Image of the Day: Pleistocene Footprints

By The Scientist Staff | March 29, 2018

Researchers find impressions left by a human some 13,000 years ago in British Columbia.

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image: Study Digs into Sexual Harassment During Fieldwork

Study Digs into Sexual Harassment During Fieldwork

By Ashley P. Taylor | October 17, 2017

Ambiguous rules and absent consequences are linked to harassment.

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Anthropologists make use of forensic science to delve into historical mysteries.

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Scientists are criticizing the claim that hominins were in North America more than 100,000 years earlier than the currently accepted estimation.

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image: Another New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>

Another New Timeline for Homo naledi

By Tracy Vence | April 27, 2017

The ancient human may have lived around 200,000 to 300,000 years ago—much more recently than previously estimated.

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image: Monkey Tools and Early Human Ingenuity

Monkey Tools and Early Human Ingenuity

By Bob Grant | October 25, 2016

Wild capuchin monkeys in Brazil produce sharp stone flakes by accident, causing some researchers to suggest a rethink of the beginnings of human tool use.

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image: Oldest-Known Proteins?

Oldest-Known Proteins?

By Ben Andrew Henry | September 19, 2016

Molecules extracted from 3.8 million-year-old ostrich eggshells appear to break the record for oldest preserved proteins.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>

Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons

By Lydia Pyne | August 1, 2016

In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.

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