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The Scientist

» circadian clocks and microbiology

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SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

By Carina Storrs | May 1, 2012

Using surface plasmon resonance to improve antibody detection and characterization: four case studies

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image: The Dark Side of Working Nights

The Dark Side of Working Nights

By Cristina Luiggi | April 11, 2012

Pulling frequent all-nighters, experiencing jet lag, and working night shifts can lead to diabetes in more than one way.

12 Comments

image: Lab Studies Lie about the Clock

Lab Studies Lie about the Clock

By Megan Scudellari | April 4, 2012

Fly circadian behavior is dramatically different in natural environments than in the lab.

10 Comments

image: Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

By Sabrina Richards | April 3, 2012

A new study shows that grooming by ants promotes colony-wide resistance to fungal infections by transferring small amounts of pathogen to nestmates.

8 Comments

Contributors

March 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Biota Babble

Biota Babble

By Edyta Zielinska | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

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image: Timed Defense

Timed Defense

By Cristina Luiggi | February 16, 2012

Plants’ circadian clocks help them gear for attack by herbivores.

2 Comments

image: TB Screen Glows Green

TB Screen Glows Green

By Sabrina Richards | February 13, 2012

Infection by GFP-encoding viruses enables quick, easy detection of tuberculosis in patient samples.

2 Comments

image: <em>C. diff</em> Infection Source Unclear

C. diff Infection Source Unclear

By Sabrina Richards | February 7, 2012

Only a quarter of Clostridium difficile infections in one hospital system were traced to contact with a symptomatic patient.

15 Comments

image: Federal Biosecurity Panel Speaks

Federal Biosecurity Panel Speaks

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2012

The US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity explains why it recommended redacting the details of studies reporting on a highly transmissible H5N1 strain.

6 Comments

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