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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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The artist discusses music as a means to get kids excited about science, and the inspiration he took from astrophysics and polar bears.

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image: U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

By | October 12, 2017

The decision to leave the United Nations’ educational, scientific, and cultural agency was spurred by what American officials say is the organization’s anti-Israel bias and lack of commitment to reform.

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image: Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

By | October 12, 2017

Scientists grew organoids that mimic human fetal brains and infected them with the Zika virus to model its neurological effects.

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image: Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

By | October 11, 2017

Loss of the CLOCK protein, which researchers find is decreased in pediatric epilepsy patients, makes mice more prone to seizures during sleep.

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image: Q&A with Michael Young, Nobel Laureate

Q&A with Michael Young, Nobel Laureate

By | October 2, 2017

Young talks with The Scientist about studying circadian rhythms in fruit flies, the applications of his work beyond Drosophila, and winning the prize. 

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image: Q&A with Nobel Laureate Michael Rosbash

Q&A with Nobel Laureate Michael Rosbash

By | October 2, 2017

A basic curiosity about how life works led the Brandeis University molecular biologist to discover how our bodies keep time. 

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image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By | October 1, 2017

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Watch This Biofilm

Watch This Biofilm

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers encoded moving images in DNA within living cells.

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