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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Pathological Altruism</em>

Book Excerpt from Pathological Altruism

By Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, and Michael McGrath | February 1, 2012

In Chapter 1, editors Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, and Michael McGrath introduce the concept of well-intentioned behaviors that go awry.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2012

Neurogastronomy, Why Calories Count, The Kitchen as Laboratory, Fear of Food

1 Comment

image: Killing with Kindness

Killing with Kindness

By Barbara Oakley, Guruprasad Madhavan, Ariel Knafo, and David Sloan Wilson | February 1, 2012

Studying the evolution of altruistic behaviors reveals how knee-jerk good intentions can backfire.

30 Comments

image: Ready for Prime Time

Ready for Prime Time

By Dennis J. Selkoe and John C. Morris | February 1, 2012

Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease are ready for widespread use in clinical trials.

1 Comment

image: Low Oxygen Saves Irradiated Brain?

Low Oxygen Saves Irradiated Brain?

By Hannah Waters | January 18, 2012

Whole brain radiation therapy costs mice some of their cognitive abilities, but treatment with low-oxygen air revives their reasoning skills.

9 Comments

image: Early Signs of Alzheimers

Early Signs of Alzheimers

By Tia Ghose | January 13, 2012

Proteins that appear before patients show symptoms of the disease could offer clues to the disease process.

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image: Ever Wonder…

Ever Wonder…

By Jef Akst | January 10, 2012

How does catnip work?

3 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By Ruth Williams | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Animal Mind Control

Animal Mind Control

By Jef Akst | January 1, 2012

Examples of parasites that manipulate the behavior of their hosts are not hard to come by, but scientists have only recently begun to understand how they induce such dramatic changes.

40 Comments

Resolving Chronic Pain

By Claudia Sommer and Frank Birklein | January 1, 2012

The body’s own mechanism for dispersing the inflammatory reaction might lead to new treatments for chronic pain.

76 Comments

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