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image: Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

By | June 30, 2014

Mice infected with a malaria-causing parasite emit odors that are more attractive to malaria-transmitting mosquitoes than uninfected animals, a study shows.

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image: Omnivore Ancestors?

Omnivore Ancestors?

By | June 26, 2014

Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat and vegetables.

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image: Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

By | June 25, 2014

E. coli repeatedly exposed to ampicillin adapt to stay dormant for longer periods of time—just long enough to outlast the antibiotic treatment.

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image: Mutation Tied to Reduced Heart Disease

Mutation Tied to Reduced Heart Disease

By | June 20, 2014

Genetic variants that cripple a triglyceride-producing protein are linked with a lower risk of heart attack and stroke.

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image: Week in Review: June 16–20

Week in Review: June 16–20

By | June 20, 2014

Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors

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An examination of 17 ancient skulls shows that some Neanderthal features arose as far back as 430,000 years ago.

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image: Ancient Fish Analyzed

Ancient Fish Analyzed

By | June 13, 2014

Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.

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image: Snake Imitators Persist

Snake Imitators Persist

By | June 12, 2014

A harmless snake in the Carolina Sandhills has been mimicking a poisonous species for decades, and has become a better imitator since the latter went extinct.

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image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

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image: Combating Asian Carp

Combating Asian Carp

By | June 5, 2014

A new plan to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive species is set in motion.

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