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» C.elegans and evolution

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image: Fighting to exist

Fighting to exist

By Jef Akst | June 14, 2011

The more closely related two species are, the more they're apt to drive one another to extinction.


image: One Hip Dino

One Hip Dino

By Jef Akst | June 13, 2011

University College London researcher Mike Taylor recounts the discovery of a new dinosaur with unusually powerful thigh muscles. Read the full story.


image: How skunks got their stripes

How skunks got their stripes

By Megan Scudellari | June 7, 2011

The evolution of bold warning coloration in mammals.


In Chapter 9, "We Were Hunted, Which is Why All of Us are Afraid Some of the Time and Some of Us are Afraid All of the Time," author Rob Dunn explains how predators shaped our evolution as we cowered and ran from their ravenous maws.


image: Dominique Bergmann: Probing Plant Pores

Dominique Bergmann: Probing Plant Pores

By Jef Akst | June 3, 2011

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Stanford University. Age: 41


image: The Gravity of Life

The Gravity of Life

By Rob Dunn | June 1, 2011

Whose well-being is threatened by our changing relationship with the myriad organisms that shaped the evolution of our species?


image: 2010's best new species

2010's best new species

By Bob Grant | May 26, 2011

This Monday (May 23), which happens to be the birthday of famed naturalist and species namer extraordinaire Carolus Linnaeus, researchers at Arizona State University listed their picks of the top 10 newly-described species of 2010. 


image: Control from Without

Control from Without

By Richard P. Grant | May 25, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology


image: Lessons from the marine census

Lessons from the marine census

By Cristina Luiggi | May 19, 2011

Now that the ten-year effort to take stock of the diversity of life in the oceans came to a triumphant end late last year, researchers involved in the Census for Marine Life are reflecting on the project's shortcomings.


image: Early freshwater life

Early freshwater life

By Cristina Luiggi | May 19, 2011

Tiny fossil tracks embedded in a California rock formation that was once part of an ancient river may be evidence that freshwater ecosystems arose around 100 million years earlier than what is generally believed.


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