The Scientist

» invasive species, neuroscience and evolution

Most Recent

image: Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism

Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism

By | November 1, 2017

Newly designed sensors detect the magnetic fields generated by electrical activity within cat brains.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain

Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain

By , , and | November 1, 2017

Recent advances in single-cell omics and other techniques are revealing variation at genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptomic levels.

0 Comments

image: Kyle Smith Shines a Light on Addiction

Kyle Smith Shines a Light on Addiction

By | November 1, 2017

The Dartmouth College professor uses optogenetics to probe the neurological routes of habitual behavior.

0 Comments

image: Lessons in Memory from a Champ

Lessons in Memory from a Champ

By | November 1, 2017

A four-time winner of the USA Memory Championship is helping scientists understand how the brain works.

1 Comment

image: Lighting Up Monkey Brains

Lighting Up Monkey Brains

By | November 1, 2017

Optogenetic and chemogenetic tools illuminate brain and behavior connections in nonhuman primates.

2 Comments

image: Memory Master

Memory Master

By | November 1, 2017

Four-time USA Memory Champion Nelson Dellis reveals some of his memory-training tactics.

0 Comments

image: The Benefits of Trepidation

The Benefits of Trepidation

By | November 1, 2017

While wiping fear from our brains may seem attractive, the emotion is an essential part of our behavioral repertoire.

0 Comments

image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

0 Comments

image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

0 Comments

image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

  4. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

RayBiotech