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image: 2017’s Science News in Review

2017’s Science News in Review

By | December 15, 2017

Hurricanes, protests, and lifesaving genetic engineering: our picks for the biggest stories of the year

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image: CRISPR to Debut in Clinical Trials

CRISPR to Debut in Clinical Trials

By | December 14, 2017

The first industry-sponsored CRISPR therapy is slated to be tested in humans in 2018.

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image: Researchers Make Knockout Stem Cell Lines in One Step

Researchers Make Knockout Stem Cell Lines in One Step

By | December 1, 2017

Combining gene editing and stem-cell induction improves efficiency of functional genetic analyses.

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image: Infographic: Combo Method of Stem Cell Generation

Infographic: Combo Method of Stem Cell Generation

By | December 1, 2017

Simultaneous exposure to reprogramming and gene-editing plasmids efficiently produces edited pluripotent colonies.

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: RNA Editing Possible with CRISPR-Cas13

RNA Editing Possible with CRISPR-Cas13

By | October 25, 2017

Scientists extend the capabilities of the CRISPR-Cas system to include precise manipulations of RNA sequences in human cells.

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image: Image of the Day: CRISPR on a Mouse Canvas

Image of the Day: CRISPR on a Mouse Canvas

By | October 25, 2017

Scientists are using CRISPR-Cas9 technology to tag and explore specific sets of neurons in mice, in one of the first steps towards building a comprehensive atlas of brain circuitry. 

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Professionals in the genetics field generally support editing the genomes of somatic cells, mirroring public opinion, but diverge from nonexperts when it comes to germline editing.

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Scientists are using a powerful gene editing technique to understand how human embryos develop.

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image: Gene Drive Limitations

Gene Drive Limitations

By | October 9, 2017

In lab populations of genetically engineered mosquitoes, mutations arose that blocked the gene drive’s spread and restored female fertility.

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