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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: RNA Editing Possible with CRISPR-Cas13

RNA Editing Possible with CRISPR-Cas13

By | October 25, 2017

Scientists extend the capabilities of the CRISPR-Cas system to include precise manipulations of RNA sequences in human cells.

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image: Image of the Day: CRISPR on a Mouse Canvas

Image of the Day: CRISPR on a Mouse Canvas

By | October 25, 2017

Scientists are using CRISPR-Cas9 technology to tag and explore specific sets of neurons in mice, in one of the first steps towards building a comprehensive atlas of brain circuitry. 

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Professionals in the genetics field generally support editing the genomes of somatic cells, mirroring public opinion, but diverge from nonexperts when it comes to germline editing.

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Scientists are using a powerful gene editing technique to understand how human embryos develop.

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image: Gene Drive Limitations

Gene Drive Limitations

By | October 9, 2017

In lab populations of genetically engineered mosquitoes, mutations arose that blocked the gene drive’s spread and restored female fertility.

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image: CRISPR System Targets RNA in Mammalian Cells

CRISPR System Targets RNA in Mammalian Cells

By | October 4, 2017

Researchers engineer bacterial CRISPR-Cas13 to knock down RNA in mammalian cells.

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image: Nonviral CRISPR Delivery a Success

Nonviral CRISPR Delivery a Success

By | October 2, 2017

Researchers use gold nanoparticles to deliver CRISPR-Cas9 and correct a point mutation in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 

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image: Flux and Uncertainty in the CRISPR Patent Landscape

Flux and Uncertainty in the CRISPR Patent Landscape

By | October 1, 2017

The battle for the control of the intellectual property surrounding CRISPR-Cas9 is as storied and nuanced as the technology itself.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Rise of the Necrofauna</em>

Book Excerpt from Rise of the Necrofauna

By | October 1, 2017

In chapter 4, “Why Recreate the Woolly Mammoth?” author Britt Wray explores the social consequences of bringing an iconic species back from extinction.

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