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image: 2017 Top 10 Innovations

2017 Top 10 Innovations

By | December 1, 2017

From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: RNA Editing Possible with CRISPR-Cas13

RNA Editing Possible with CRISPR-Cas13

By | October 25, 2017

Scientists extend the capabilities of the CRISPR-Cas system to include precise manipulations of RNA sequences in human cells.

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image: Image of the Day: CRISPR on a Mouse Canvas

Image of the Day: CRISPR on a Mouse Canvas

By | October 25, 2017

Scientists are using CRISPR-Cas9 technology to tag and explore specific sets of neurons in mice, in one of the first steps towards building a comprehensive atlas of brain circuitry. 

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image: Gene Drive Limitations

Gene Drive Limitations

By | October 9, 2017

In lab populations of genetically engineered mosquitoes, mutations arose that blocked the gene drive’s spread and restored female fertility.

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image: CRISPR System Targets RNA in Mammalian Cells

CRISPR System Targets RNA in Mammalian Cells

By | October 4, 2017

Researchers engineer bacterial CRISPR-Cas13 to knock down RNA in mammalian cells.

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image: Flux and Uncertainty in the CRISPR Patent Landscape

Flux and Uncertainty in the CRISPR Patent Landscape

By | October 1, 2017

The battle for the control of the intellectual property surrounding CRISPR-Cas9 is as storied and nuanced as the technology itself.

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Researchers use base-editing to swap out an erroneous nucleotide responsible for a potentially life-threatening blood disorder.

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image: Most Accurate CRISPR Gene Editing Yet

Most Accurate CRISPR Gene Editing Yet

By | September 22, 2017

A tweaked Cas9 nuclease reduces off-target effects to levels below that of previous versions of the enzyme.

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image: Jumping Genes Inactivated with CRISPR in Pigs

Jumping Genes Inactivated with CRISPR in Pigs

By | August 10, 2017

The study could pave the way for transplanting porcine organs to humans without the risk of reigniting endogenous retroviruses.

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