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SHERLOCK and DETECTR can identify particular nucleic acid sequences, while CAMERA records events in human and bacterial cells.

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Researchers use the technique to turn on Oct4 or Sox2 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and convert them into pluripotent cells. 

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The findings more than double the number of known defense mechanisms, piquing the interests of molecular biology tool developers.

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Researchers identify antibodies for two commonly used Cas9 proteins in human blood. Investors take notice.

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image: 2017 in Quotes

2017 in Quotes

By Catherine Offord | December 28, 2017

Gender discrimination, Brexit, and climate change are among the issues that have received considerable attention from the scientific community this year.

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image: Top Technical Advances in 2017

Top Technical Advances in 2017

By Shawna Williams | December 25, 2017

The year’s most impressive achievements include new methods to extend CRISPR editing, patch-clamp neurons hands-free, and analyze the contents of live cells.

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image: CRISPR Proves Promising for Treating ALS in Mice

CRISPR Proves Promising for Treating ALS in Mice

By Katarina Zimmer | December 21, 2017

The gene-editing tool was effective in disabling a defective gene responsible for some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 

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image: CRISPR to Debut in Clinical Trials

CRISPR to Debut in Clinical Trials

By Diana Kwon | December 14, 2017

The first industry-sponsored CRISPR therapy is slated to be tested in humans in 2018.

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image: 2017 Top 10 Innovations

2017 Top 10 Innovations

By The Scientist Staff | December 1, 2017

From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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