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image: Top 7 in Genomics & Genetics

Top 7 in Genomics & Genetics

By Bob Grant | July 19, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in genomics, genetics, and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

6 Comments

image: Neanderthal DNA in Modern Humans

Neanderthal DNA in Modern Humans

By Jef Akst | July 19, 2011

Non-African people carry remnants of the Neanderthal X chromosome, suggesting interbreeding with early human ancestors.

51 Comments

image: Tailor-Made Genome

Tailor-Made Genome

By Tia Ghose | July 18, 2011

A method for rapidly replacing stop codons throughout the genetic code of E. coli paves the way for biomanufacturing designer proteins.

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image: Stem Cell Approvals Are Up

Stem Cell Approvals Are Up

By Jef Akst | July 18, 2011

The number of human embryonic stem cells approved for federal funding continues to grow.

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image: Zinc Fingers Bear Fruit

Zinc Fingers Bear Fruit

By Bob Grant | July 18, 2011

A method for precise gene editing is able to change disease-causing point mutations in human stem cell DNA.

3 Comments

image: Most Wanted Toad Found

Most Wanted Toad Found

By Jef Akst | July 15, 2011

A colorful toad that has been missing for 87 years is discovered in Malaysia.

0 Comments

image: Animal Experiments Increase in the UK

Animal Experiments Increase in the UK

By Megan Scudellari | July 14, 2011

The hike is attributed to expanded use of genetically modified and mutant animals.

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image: Learning Addiction

Learning Addiction

By Cristina Luiggi | July 13, 2011

Eleanor Simpson, a neuroscientist at Columbia University Medical Center, discusses a recent Nature paper that probes dopamine's role in helping animals make positive associations to stimuli that herald pleasurable outcomes (such as the handing out of food).

9 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By Cristina Luiggi | July 13, 2011

Meet the species whose DNA has recently been sequenced.

0 Comments

image: Circadian Signs of Aging

Circadian Signs of Aging

By Kerry Grens | July 13, 2011

The neural nexus of the circadian clock shows signs of functional decline as mice age, providing clues as to why sleep patterns tend to change as people grow older.

27 Comments

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