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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Fish Size, Vision Skills Explained

Fish Size, Vision Skills Explained

By | November 5, 2015

Scientists describe molecular underpinnings of salmon size and of fishes’ ability to navigate murky environments in separate studies.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Phase 3 Win for Gene Therapy

Phase 3 Win for Gene Therapy

By | October 6, 2015

The treatment restored sight among people with an inherited visual impairment.

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image: Redirecting Gene Therapy Restores Sight

Redirecting Gene Therapy Restores Sight

By | August 17, 2015

By targeting rhodopsin genes to neurons, scientists help blind mice see.

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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image: Pupil Alignment of Predators and Prey

Pupil Alignment of Predators and Prey

By | August 11, 2015

Ambush predators are more likely to have vertical slit pupils, while foraging animals tend to have horizontal ones, a study shows.

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