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image: Infographic: The Various Forms of Methylated DNA

Infographic: The Various Forms of Methylated DNA

By | September 1, 2017

To expand the basic nucleotide alphabet, many species modify their DNA with epigenetic marks.

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image: Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a protein called Sara found on the surface of endosomes appears to be a key regulator of asymmetric splitting in fruit flies.

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image: The Role of DNA Base Modifications

The Role of DNA Base Modifications

By | September 1, 2017

Researchers are just beginning to scratch the surface of how several newly recognized epigenetic changes function in the genome.

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image: Global Patterns of Human Epigenetic Variation

Global Patterns of Human Epigenetic Variation

By | August 28, 2017

A study of five far-flung human populations gives clues to adaptations to environmental pressures.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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image: Fascinated by Folding

Fascinated by Folding

By | August 4, 2017

Lila Gierasch uses biochemical tools to understand how linear chains of amino acids turn into complex three-dimensional structures.

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image: Company Sells a “Biological Age” Kit

Company Sells a “Biological Age” Kit

By | August 2, 2017

While the epigenetic clock is a useful tool for research and has solid scientific backing, scientists say the product’s use to consumers is limited.

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A new method stimulates B cells to make human antigen-specific antibodies, obviating the need for vaccinating blood donors or hunting for rare B cells.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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