Most Recent

image: Stem Cell Alter Egos

Stem Cell Alter Egos

By Abby Olena | April 1, 2014

Researchers show that cancer stem cells can exist in two distinct and interconvertible states.

1 Comment

image: Cysteine Aids Mice with Huntington’s

Cysteine Aids Mice with Huntington’s

By Kerry Grens | March 31, 2014

Rodent models of Huntington’s disease show dysfunctional cysteine production, and adding the amino acid to their diets seems to relieve symptoms.  


image: STAP Confusion Abounds

STAP Confusion Abounds

By Jef Akst | March 31, 2014

Stem cells supposedly derived by the new method of stimulus-induced acquisition of pluripotency may have come from mouse strains other than those claimed.


image: Python Auto-Pilot

Python Auto-Pilot

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | March 20, 2014

Invasive snakes in Florida show evidence of a compass sense they use to navigate back to home territory.


image: Old-School Fish Guides

Old-School Fish Guides

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | March 18, 2014

Experienced fish may be critical for keeping migrating populations on track, a study finds.


image: Ancient Moss Reincarnated

Ancient Moss Reincarnated

By Jef Akst | March 18, 2014

Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years yield plants that can be brought back to life in the lab.

1 Comment

image: Goat Pheromone Double Whammy

Goat Pheromone Double Whammy

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | March 3, 2014

A single molecule emitted by male goats may influence female goat physiology and behavior.

1 Comment

image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By Jonathan Slack | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.


image: Exosome Tentacles

Exosome Tentacles

By Kerry Grens | March 1, 2014

Unlike the usual smooth, spherical shape of exosomes, glioblastoma-derived exosomes appear to have long nanofilaments protruding from their surfaces.


image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By Jef Akst | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.


Popular Now

  1. Could Rapamycin Help Humans Live Longer?
  2. Renowned Physicist Stephen Hawking Dies
  3. Pupil Response to an Optical Illusion Tied to Autistic Traits
  4. John Sulston, Human Genome Project Leader, Dies