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image: Image of the Day: Red-Hot Mitochondria

Image of the Day: Red-Hot Mitochondria

By The Scientist Staff | January 29, 2018

Mitochondria may sustain temperatures more than 10 °C warmer than human cells, say researchers. 

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Researchers use the technique to turn on Oct4 or Sox2 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and convert them into pluripotent cells. 

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The findings more than double the number of known defense mechanisms, piquing the interests of molecular biology tool developers.

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image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

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image: High-Throughput Epigenetics Analyses

High-Throughput Epigenetics Analyses

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | January 1, 2018

Emerging technologies help researchers draw mechanistic links between metabolism and epigenetic modification of DNA.

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image: Glial Ties to Persistent Pain

Glial Ties to Persistent Pain

By Mark R. Hutchinson | January 1, 2018

Immune-like cells in the central nervous system are now recognized as key participants in the creation and maintenance of persistent pain.

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image: Infographic: A Painful Pathway

Infographic: A Painful Pathway

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Since the mid-2000s, the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 has emerged as a promising target for a new class of analgesics.

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image: Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

By Mark R. Hutchinson | January 1, 2018

The acute pain that results from injury or disease is very different from chronic pain.

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After an initial wounding, genes needed for repair remain ready for action.

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image: Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

The race to develop analgesic drugs that inhibit sodium channel NaV1.7 is revealing a complex sensory role for the protein.

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