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image: Opinion: The Flood Reduction Benefits of Wetlands

Opinion: The Flood Reduction Benefits of Wetlands

By and | August 31, 2017

Conservationists and the insurance industry team up to model the economic benefits of marshes during hurricanes.

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image: Science Labs Offer Help to Texas Researchers

Science Labs Offer Help to Texas Researchers

By | August 29, 2017

Sparked by a tweet from a Philadelphia scientist, the March for Science–Houston has launched a database of facilities offering to host reagents and researchers. 

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image: Labs in Texas Batten Down the Hatches

Labs in Texas Batten Down the Hatches

By and | August 25, 2017

As Hurricane Harvey approaches land, researchers wait to see if their preparations will protect their experiments.

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image: Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

By | August 18, 2017

A memory B cell response to Zika virus in dengue-infected patients produced antibodies that were poorly neutralizing in vitro and instead enhanced infection.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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