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image: The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

By | December 6, 2017

Three new strategies for using DNA to generate large, self-assembling shapes create everything from a nanoscale teddy bear to a nanoscale Mona Lisa.

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image: Cargo-Sorting DNA Robots

Cargo-Sorting DNA Robots

By | September 14, 2017

Autonomous molecules that collect, carry, and sort different genetic packages usher in a new era for nucleic-acid robotics. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | July 17, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the July/August issue of The Scientist.

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image: DNA Origami

DNA Origami

By | July 17, 2017

Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?

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image: Twists and Turns

Twists and Turns

By | July 17, 2017

New starring roles for nucleic acids

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image: Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

By | July 17, 2017

The versatility of geometric shapes made from the nucleic acid are proving useful in a wide variety of fields from molecular computation to biology to medicine.

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image: More-Stable DNA Origami

More-Stable DNA Origami

By | July 23, 2015

Scientists build nanoscale mesh models of a rabbit and a human stick figure, among other things. 

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image: Giant DNA Origami

Giant DNA Origami

By | September 18, 2014

Researchers create the largest 3-D DNA structures to date, many times bigger than previously constructed origami shapes.

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