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image: Meet An Artist With No Hands

Meet An Artist With No Hands

By | June 1, 2016

The brain can compensate for missing body parts, allowing some people, such as Matthias Buchinger, to function at a very high level despite their disabilities.

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image: Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

By | June 1, 2016

Pooping into a petri dish is becoming standard practice as part of some college biology courses.

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image: Zebra Finches Aid Neurodegeneration Research

Zebra Finches Aid Neurodegeneration Research

By | June 1, 2016

Bird brains might tell us a lot about how human brains malfunction in diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

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image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.

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image: Pioneering Memory Researcher Dies

Pioneering Memory Researcher Dies

By | May 31, 2016

Suzanne Corkin, who studied the famous patient “H.M.,” has passed away at 79.

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image: Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

By | May 25, 2016

Researchers assess some of the downstream effects of treating livestock with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.

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A Congressional investigation indicates that the National Football League may have sought to steer millions of dollars in National Institutes of Health funding away from one of its critics.

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Post-publication peer review prompts the authors to clarify the ages of mice used in their experiments and share additional data.

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image: Narrow-Spectrum Antibiotic Could Spare the Microbiome

Narrow-Spectrum Antibiotic Could Spare the Microbiome

By | May 9, 2016

A drug that singles out Staphylococcus aureus leaves gut-dwelling microbiota largely intact, a mouse study shows.

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image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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