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image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

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image: Microbes Expel Swarms of Vesicles

Microbes Expel Swarms of Vesicles

By | January 10, 2014

Scientists present the first evidence that marine cyanobacteria release vesicles—billions and billions of vesicles.

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image: Toxin Wipes Out Persistent HIV

Toxin Wipes Out Persistent HIV

By | January 10, 2014

An antibody-toxin combo kills residual HIV hiding out in the organs of mice.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Superbug Sickens Dozens in Illinois

Superbug Sickens Dozens in Illinois

By | January 9, 2014

A single hospital was at the epicenter of an outbreak of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

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image: Common Lab Mice Differ

Common Lab Mice Differ

By | January 8, 2014

Related substrains of the Black 6 lab mouse carry key genetic polymorphisms, including one that has a dramatic effect on the rodents’ responses to cocaine.

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image: Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice

Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice

By | January 7, 2014

Scientists show that fiber’s influence on gut microbes affects the lungs’ response to allergens.

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image: Benjamin tenOever: Going Viral

Benjamin tenOever: Going Viral

By | January 1, 2014

Professor, Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Age: 36

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image: Farmer Fungi

Farmer Fungi

By | January 1, 2014

Researchers uncover an unprecedented relationship between morels and bacteria. But can it be called agriculture?

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