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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

By and | September 4, 2017

Some researchers are at risk of job loss and even deportation if Trump decides to end a program that allows undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children to obtain work permits. 

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image: Baby on Board

Baby on Board

By | September 1, 2017

Many scientific conferences offer child care options that allow researchers to bring their families along for the trip.

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image: A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan

A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan

By | August 28, 2017

E. coli that make indoles protect older worms, flies, and mice from frailty. 

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image: Image of the Day: Power Move 

Image of the Day: Power Move 

By | July 25, 2017

When certain neurons in the prefrontal neurons cortex are turned on, mice subjugate their neighbors in a display of power. 

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image: Image of the Day: Cortical Lightning Storm

Image of the Day: Cortical Lightning Storm

By | July 18, 2017

Neurons in a mouse model of autism consistently fire in response to whisker agitation.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium aims to characterize the entire mouse genome, starting first with more than 3,300 genes. 

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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