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image: America’s First Pooches

America’s First Pooches

By | January 27, 2015

Study of ancient dog DNA sheds light on early Americans’ relationships with their pets.

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image: Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

By | January 21, 2015

A point mutation analysis of the entire human genome finds that alterations to as many as 7.5 percent of nucleotides may have contributed to humans’ evolutionary split from chimpanzees.

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image: Tracking Tuberculosis Over Time

Tracking Tuberculosis Over Time

By | January 19, 2015

Genomic analysis of a multidrug-resistant lineage pinpoints historical correlations with human events.

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image: Reassessing One Really Old Fish

Reassessing One Really Old Fish

By | January 13, 2015

New analysis of an ancient specimen prompts a rethink of fish forebears.

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image: The Benefits of Being a “Bearded Lady”

The Benefits of Being a “Bearded Lady”

By | January 8, 2015

A study of female eastern fence lizards that bear a distinctly male trait yields tantalizing clues about the tradeoffs involved in blurring the lines of sexual dimorphism.

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Contributors

By | January 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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image: May the Best Rodent Win

May the Best Rodent Win

By | January 1, 2015

Are mice, considered by some to be the less intelligent rodent, edging out rats as laboratory models of decision making?

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image: Performance Art

Performance Art

By | January 1, 2015

Regulation of genome expression orchestrates the behavior of insect castes and the human response to social stress.

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image: Why, Oh Y?

Why, Oh Y?

By | January 1, 2015

A toothpick and a bit of chance shaped David Page’s career, which he has dedicated to understanding the mammalian Y chromosome and fetal germ cell development.

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