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image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

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image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

By | October 23, 2017

Researchers identify 72 novel genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk.

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image: FDA Approves Second CAR T-Cell Therapy

FDA Approves Second CAR T-Cell Therapy

By | October 19, 2017

The therapy, produced by Kite Pharma and owned by Gilead Sciences, is approved for use against some types of large B-cell lymphomas. 

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image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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image: Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

By | October 16, 2017

In mice, the tumor cells are able to thwart the immune response that would kill them—but immunotherapy prevented the return of melanoma.

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A needle-free alternative to the finger-prick test would be a godsend for many sufferers of diabetes, but the industry has yet to clear the technological hurdles.

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Spark Therapeutics’s Luxturna would be the first approved therapy in the U.S. that replaces or repairs a defective gene inherited from one’s parents.

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