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image: The Year in Pathogens

The Year in Pathogens

By Molly Sharlach | December 29, 2014

Ebola, MERS, and enterovirus D68; polio eradication efforts; new regulations on potentially dangerous research


image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By Molly Sharlach | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.


image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By Ruth Williams | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.


image: Platelets Fan Inflammation

Platelets Fan Inflammation

By Kate Yandell | December 4, 2014

The circulating blood cells bind to neutrophils, prompting inflammation-related activity in these immune cell partners.


image: Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

By Molly Sharlach | December 4, 2014

A carbohydrate antigen found on cells of E. coli and other species prompts a potent immune response against malaria-causing parasites in mice.

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image: All Systems Go

All Systems Go

By Anna Azvolinsky | December 1, 2014

Alan Aderem earned his PhD while under house arrest for protesting apartheid in South Africa. His early political involvement has guided his scientific focus, encouraging fellow systems biologists to study immunology and infectious diseases.


image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By Jef Akst | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.


image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By Ruth Williams | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.


image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By A. Marmaduke Kilpatrick | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.


image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By Molly Sharlach | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is associated with sea star wasting disease.


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