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image: Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

By | May 9, 2013

The decline of a population of Arctic foxes isolated on a small Russian island may be due to mercury pollution from their diet of seabirds and seals.

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image: Brain Is Command Center for Aging

Brain Is Command Center for Aging

By | May 1, 2013

Inflammation in the hypothalamus may induce degeneration in tissues throughout the body.

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image: Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

By | April 24, 2013

Researchers in the Amazon are measuring how much carbon dioxide fertilizes the rainforest.

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image: Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

By | April 8, 2013

Scientists are stumped as to why hundreds of starved pups have been washing up on the California shore.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Bridges for UK Water Voles

Bridges for UK Water Voles

By | March 20, 2013

Newly constructed ramps will expand the habitat available to a colony of water voles in London, and similar ramps elsewhere could encourage isolated populations to mix.   

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image: Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

By | March 8, 2013

Native Australian frog tadpoles outcompete the tadpoles of the invasive cane toad, suggesting the native frogs could form part of a suburban control program.

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image: Mice Learn Faster with Human Glia

Mice Learn Faster with Human Glia

By | March 7, 2013

Mice with human brain cells showed enhanced synaptic plasticity and learning, suggesting glia may be key to our cognitive prowess.  

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