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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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image: Another New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>

Another New Timeline for Homo naledi

By | April 27, 2017

The ancient human may have lived around 200,000 to 300,000 years ago—much more recently than previously estimated.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Study: Diet Contributes to Brain Size

Study: Diet Contributes to Brain Size

By | March 30, 2017

The results of a historical primate behavior analysis suggest that species with fruit-filled diets evolved larger brains.

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image: In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

By | March 29, 2017

Corbiculate bees and their gut-dwelling microbes have been coevolving since the social species evolved from their solitary ancestors around 80 million years ago, scientists suggest. 

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image: Dinosaur Phylogenetic Tree Shake-Up

Dinosaur Phylogenetic Tree Shake-Up

By | March 24, 2017

An analysis of 74 dinosaur species leads a group of researchers to reorganize the extinct animals’ evolutionary history.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

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