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image: Micronutrients, Macro Impact

Micronutrients, Macro Impact

By | June 1, 2017

At the interface of food, nutrition, and agriculture, Lindsay Allen’s research has been informing nutrition guidelines and policies around the world for decades.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: The Celiac Surge

The Celiac Surge

By | June 1, 2017

A rapid increase in the global incidence of the condition has researchers scrambling to understand the causes of the trend, and cope with the consequences.

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: Another New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>

Another New Timeline for Homo naledi

By | April 27, 2017

The ancient human may have lived around 200,000 to 300,000 years ago—much more recently than previously estimated.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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