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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: Spiders with Long Tails Found in Ancient Amber

Spiders with Long Tails Found in Ancient Amber

By Jim Daley | February 5, 2018

This discovery closes a 170-million-year gap in the fossil record.

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image: Image of the Day: Bacterial Highways

Image of the Day: Bacterial Highways

By The Scientist Staff | January 25, 2018

Fungal pathways in cheese rinds affect the composition of bacterial communities residing there.

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image: Image of the Day: See You Later!

Image of the Day: See You Later!

By The Scientist Staff | January 8, 2018

Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 

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Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

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The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.

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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By Shawna Williams | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Aggie Mika | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By Andrew F. Read and Peter J. Kerr | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By Andrew F. Read and Peter J. Kerr | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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