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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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image: Something Is Killing Asian Carp

Something Is Killing Asian Carp

By | April 29, 2014

Half a million invasive silver carp are dead in a Kentucky river, and nobody knows why.

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image: The Promise of Nanomedicine

The Promise of Nanomedicine

By | April 8, 2014

At AACR, scientists discuss the growing interest in nanotechnology and how it can be used to study, diagnose, and treat cancer.

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image: DARPA Puts Biotech at the Fore

DARPA Puts Biotech at the Fore

By | April 4, 2014

The U.S. Department of Defense is solidifying its focus on the life sciences with a new division of biotechnology.  

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Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2014

Cancer Virus, A Window on Eternity, Murderous Minds, and The Extreme Life of the Sea

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Python Auto-Pilot

By | March 20, 2014

Invasive snakes in Florida show evidence of a compass sense they use to navigate back to home territory.

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image: Old-School Fish Guides

Old-School Fish Guides

By | March 18, 2014

Experienced fish may be critical for keeping migrating populations on track, a study finds.

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image: Ancient Moss Reincarnated

Ancient Moss Reincarnated

By | March 18, 2014

Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years yield plants that can be brought back to life in the lab.

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image: Biotech Superstar Dies

Biotech Superstar Dies

By | March 7, 2014

Alejandro Zaffaroni, who launched companies that developed birth control pills, microarrays, and transdermal drug patches, has died at age 91.  

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image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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