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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By Jef Akst | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.


image: Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

By Kerry Grens | March 2, 2016

The genome of a mimivirus strain resistant to a virophage has repeated phage sequences alongside nuclease- and helicase-coding sections.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club


image: Dial It Up, Dial It Down

Dial It Up, Dial It Down

By Kelly Rae Chi | March 1, 2016

Newer CRISPR tools for manipulating transcription will help unlock noncoding RNA’s many roles.


image: Spoiler Alert

Spoiler Alert

By Wudan Yan | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

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image: TS Picks: February 29, 2016

TS Picks: February 29, 2016

By Bob Grant | February 29, 2016

Reintroduced apes facing challenges; Zika conspiracy theories sow confusion; UK researchers nervous about new anti-lobbying law


image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By Kerry Grens | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.


image: Toward Making Sperm in the Lab

Toward Making Sperm in the Lab

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | February 25, 2016

Researchers devise a technique for creating gametes from murine embryonic stem cells.


image: TS Picks: February 24, 2016

TS Picks: February 24, 2016

By Tracy Vence | February 24, 2016

High-profile stem cell research scandal; forthcoming direct-to-consumer genetics apps; GINA and life insurance


image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By Ashley P. Taylor | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.


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