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image: Advantages of Neanderthal DNA in the Human Genome

Advantages of Neanderthal DNA in the Human Genome

By Anna Azvolinsky | November 10, 2016

The retention of ancient hominin DNA in modern human genomes may have helped our ancestors adapt to life in diverse environments. 

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image: Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

By Anna Azvolinsky | July 21, 2016

Symbiotic gut bacteria evolved and diverged along with ape and human lineages, researchers find. 

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Remnants of fires indicate modern humans may have lived around the same time as Homo floresiensis.

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image: Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

By Tanya Lewis | June 8, 2016

The 700,000-year-old teeth and jawbones of small hominins may be the oldest remnants of Homo floresiensis.

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image: Neanderthals Built Structures Underground

Neanderthals Built Structures Underground

By Bob Grant | May 31, 2016

A new analysis of stalagmites stacked deep within a French cave suggests that the ancient hominin was capable of planning and carrying out construction projects.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By Catherine Offord | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By The Scientist Staff | June 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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