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Once implanted in mice, the edited stem cells produced normal hemoglobin.

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Ambry Genetics CEO Aaron Elliott discusses his team’s recent analysis of 20,000 clinical next-generation sequencing panels.

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image: Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

By | October 1, 2016

Companies focused on developing treatments for dogs, cats, and horses are bringing a diverse array of products to the pet medicine market.

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image: Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

By | October 1, 2016

As the importance of genomic copy number variations for health and disease becomes clearer, researchers are creating new ways to detect these changes in the genome.

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image: Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

By | September 30, 2016

Genetic variants on chromosome 26 appears to play a role in a dog’s tendency to turn to people for help.

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image: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

By | September 28, 2016

Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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The National Institutes of Health is hosting a two-day conference on how the virus affects infants and children. The take-home message so far: microcephaly is but one of many potential problems for Zika-exposed fetuses.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Matching the immunological characteristics of donor retinal cells to those of the recipient can reduce the chance of rejection.

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image: Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

By | September 12, 2016

Byproducts of gut microbes in some 1-month–old babies trigger inflammation that is linked to later asthma development, researchers find.

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