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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

The new database includes data from 27,000 samples collected at sites ranging from Alaskan permafrost to the ocean floor.

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Puerto Rico’s Cayo Santiago has hosted decades of research in cognition, primatology, immunization, and other areas.

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image: California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

By Catherine Offord | January 15, 2018

Researchers suspect the source of the toxins may be some of the state’s 50,000 or so marijuana farms.

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image: Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

By Ruth Williams | January 10, 2018

The near-complete feminization of northern Great Barrier Reef sea turtles has been blamed on climate change.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By Steve Graff | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects

Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects

By Anna Azvolinsky | October 18, 2017

A 27-year-long study finds insect biomass has declined by about 75 percent. 

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The dolphins and their trainers will search for the endangered porpoises and enclose them in a protected pen.

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image: How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

By Ashley Yeager | October 6, 2017

Studies suggest not all critters fare well in extreme weather, though some thrive.

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image: Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

By Ashley Yeager | September 28, 2017

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave, scientists say.

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