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image: Philanthropic Funding Makes Waves in Basic Science

Philanthropic Funding Makes Waves in Basic Science

By Bob Grant | December 1, 2017

Private funders are starting to support big projects, and they’re rewriting the playbook on fueling scientific research.

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image: Hundreds of Pterosaur Eggs Discovered in China

Hundreds of Pterosaur Eggs Discovered in China

By Kerry Grens | November 30, 2017

The fossil booty includes some eggs with embryo remains inside, and points to group nests involving long-term parental care.

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image: Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 

Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 

By The Scientist Staff | November 29, 2017

Scientists have identified a new genus of extinct horse that lived in North America during the last ice age. 

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image: Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

By The Scientist Staff | November 28, 2017

Scientists study the development of scales in skate embryos. 

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The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.

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An analysis of President Trump’s proposed $7.2 billion slash to the National Institutes of Health budget points to dire consequences for the development of novel drugs.

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Agriculture faculty members allege funding from industry organizations is tied to their employment status.

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image: Republican Tax Plan Eliminates Popular Education Exemptions

Republican Tax Plan Eliminates Popular Education Exemptions

By Shawna Williams | November 6, 2017

The proposal draws criticism from higher-education groups.

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By The Scientist Staff | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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image: Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

By Katarina Zimmer | November 2, 2017

The Tapanuli orangutan has been identified as the newest species of great ape, but also likely the most endangered. 

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