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image: CRISPR 2.0?

CRISPR 2.0?

By | September 28, 2015

A pioneer of the gene-editing technique discovers a protein that could improve its accuracy.

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image: Local Microbes Give Wine Character

Local Microbes Give Wine Character

By | September 24, 2015

Yeast strains from different regions of New Zealand generate wines with varying chemistries.

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image: Venter Enters the Consumer Genomics Biz

Venter Enters the Consumer Genomics Biz

By | September 22, 2015

The genomic entrepreneur has struck a deal with a South African health insurer to sequence the exomes of its customers.

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image: Genetics, Immunity, and the Microbiome

Genetics, Immunity, and the Microbiome

By | September 16, 2015

The makeup of an individual’s microbiome correlates with genetic variation in immunity-related pathways, a study shows.

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image: Direct-to-Consumer Liquid Biopsy

Direct-to-Consumer Liquid Biopsy

By | September 13, 2015

Some doctors advise shoppers to be skeptical of a newly marketed cancer diagnostic.

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image: Characterizing DNA Quadruplexes

Characterizing DNA Quadruplexes

By | September 10, 2015

Researchers are developing new techniques to better understand how and why knots of DNA are distributed throughout the genome.

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image: Ancient DNA Elucidates Basque Origins

Ancient DNA Elucidates Basque Origins

By | September 9, 2015

Researchers find that the people of northern Spain and southern France are an amalgam of early Iberian farmers and local hunters.

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image: Unexpectedly Wild

Unexpectedly Wild

By | September 1, 2015

Genomic analysis reveals pigs interbred with wild boars during domestication.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2015

Brain Storms, Orphan, Maize for the Gods, and Paranoid.

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image: Phytochemical Helps Differentiate Workers from Queen Bees

Phytochemical Helps Differentiate Workers from Queen Bees

By | August 28, 2015

The consumption of p-coumaric acid, a chemical found in honey and pollen, may help set a female honeybee on its course to becoming a worker instead of a queen.

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