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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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image: Touchy Feely

Touchy Feely

By | June 1, 2015

Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.

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image: William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

By | June 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics, Stanford University. Age: 35

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image: What’s Old Is New Again

What’s Old Is New Again

By | June 1, 2015

Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.

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image: WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

By | May 27, 2015

World Health Organization officials endorse a global strategy to combat the spread of antibiotic resistance.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 21, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Human Genes Can Save Yeast

Human Genes Can Save Yeast

By | May 21, 2015

Replacing yeast genes with their human equivalents reveals functional conservation despite a billion years of divergent evolution.

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image: Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

By | May 19, 2015

The midwestern U.S. and central Asia are at high risk for new disease outbreaks from pathogen-bearing rodents, according to a study.

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