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Innovation Renovation

By | January 1, 2015

Is the fear of funding and doing fundamental, risky research killing our ability to make breakthroughs?

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Micro Masterpiece

By | January 1, 2015

The artful science of Tom Deerinck, a micrographer who consistently places in Nikon’s Small World competition

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Rat Race

By | January 1, 2015

Neuroscientist Anthony Zador explains why he uses rats to understand auditory attention in the brain.

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2015

January 2015's selection of notable quotes

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Tangle Trigger

By | January 1, 2015

An enzyme that cleaves tau protein in acidic cellular conditions may trigger early events in Alzheimer’s disease.

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2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

By | December 24, 2014

The best of The Scientist’s popular daily image posts

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Brain-Machine Interface Goes Wireless

By | December 18, 2014

A paralyzed woman has used mind power and a robotic arm wirelessly connected to her brain to achieve the most dexterous movement yet accomplished with BMI.

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Big Data and the Brain

By | December 8, 2014

Advances in imaging have inundated neuroscientists with massive amounts of information on synaptic connections, among other things. The challenge now is to understand it all.

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image: Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

By | December 8, 2014

Blocking activity of a kinase in a mouse model protects Golgi in cells and reduces the build-up of amyloid β, a primary component of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Bat Navigation Revealed

By | December 4, 2014

As the flying mammals navigate complex environments, they make use of specialized brain cells that cooperate to build a coordinate system that works in three dimensions.

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