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» DNA sequencing, neuroscience and evolution

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image: Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

By Anna Azvolinsky | July 21, 2016

Symbiotic gut bacteria evolved and diverged along with ape and human lineages, researchers find. 

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image: How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain

By Mallory Locklear | July 21, 2016

The results of studies on humans and zebrafish suggest how hyperglycemia can cause cognitive deficits.

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image: Mapping the Human Connectome

Mapping the Human Connectome

By Tanya Lewis | July 20, 2016

A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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image: Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

By Alison F. Takemura | July 14, 2016

Gualicho shinyae evolved small limbs independently of T. rex, researchers report.

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image: Allen Institute Launches Brain Observatory

Allen Institute Launches Brain Observatory

By Tanya Lewis | July 13, 2016

The first data include real-time neural activity in the visual cortex of mice observing pictures and videos.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By Bob Grant | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By Jenny Rood | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By Waleed Rahmani, Sarthak Sinha, and Jeff Biernaskie | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By Tanya Lewis | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

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