The Scientist

» DNA sequencing, culture and evolution

Most Recent

image: Kate Rubins Was the First to Sequence DNA in Space

Kate Rubins Was the First to Sequence DNA in Space

By | September 1, 2017

The virologist turned NASA astronaut pioneered DNA sequencing in space and conducted experiments in microgravity.

0 Comments

image: Global Patterns of Human Epigenetic Variation

Global Patterns of Human Epigenetic Variation

By | August 28, 2017

A study of five far-flung human populations gives clues to adaptations to environmental pressures.

5 Comments

image: Researchers Hijack a Computer Using DNA Malware

Researchers Hijack a Computer Using DNA Malware

By | August 11, 2017

Malicious code written with nucleic acids could one day threaten sequencing facilities, the team warns.

0 Comments

image: Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

By | August 11, 2017

The turtle-headed sea snake is losing its stripes, and researchers suggest that the change reflects adaptation to fouled oceans.

1 Comment

The genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don’t resolve the animals’ debated evolutionary story.

1 Comment

A cardiovascular surgeon’s research was rejected for publication because it referenced evolutionary theory, Turkish outlets report, while the university at the center of the tumult claims the story is false. 

4 Comments

Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

0 Comments

image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

6 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

0 Comments

The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  3. Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?
  4. Putative Gay Genes Identified, Questioned
    The Nutshell Putative Gay Genes Identified, Questioned

    A genomic interrogation of homosexuality turns up speculative links between genetic elements and sexual orientation, but researchers say the study is too small to be significant. 

FreeShip