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image: Sequencing at Sea

Sequencing at Sea

By | August 1, 2014

Watch University of Florida biologist Leonid Moroz describe his novel approach aboard his floating genome sequencing lab.

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image: Sequencing on the Seven Seas

Sequencing on the Seven Seas

By | August 1, 2014

Researchers have installed an advanced genomics lab facility aboard a boat to create a floating molecular testing facility for marine life sciences

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image: Visualizing the Ocular Microbiome

Visualizing the Ocular Microbiome

By | May 12, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.

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image: Unsinkable Evidence

Unsinkable Evidence

By | May 1, 2014

Genetic testing disproves one woman’s claims to have been a survivor of the Titanic disaster.

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image: Venter's New Venture

Venter's New Venture

By | March 5, 2014

The genomics pioneer is starting a new company that aims to tackle the mysteries of human aging.

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image: Air Traffic

Air Traffic

By | March 1, 2014

Scientists use DNA sequencing to identify what’s attracting birds to airports, where midair collisions with planes can be devastating.

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image: Keys to the Minibar

Keys to the Minibar

By | March 1, 2014

Degraded DNA from museum specimens, scat, and other sources has thwarted barcoding efforts, but researchers are filling in the gaps with mini-versions of characteristic genomic stretches.

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image: The Benefits of Barcoding

The Benefits of Barcoding

By | March 1, 2014

Watch DNA barcoder Mehrdad Hajibabaei from the University of Guelph describe the technology’s potential.

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image: Should Standard Prenatal Screening be Scrapped?

Should Standard Prenatal Screening be Scrapped?

By | February 28, 2014

Researchers suggest that a new prenatal DNA test should become the new standard to detect Down syndrome in fetuses.

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image: $1,000 Genome at Last?

$1,000 Genome at Last?

By | January 15, 2014

Illumina says its newest sequencing system can churn out whole human genomes for $1,000 apiece.

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